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DarQ 2.0 Is Here, It Adopts Android 12's Dynamic Color Feature

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Android 12’s Dynamic Color is a really nifty feature. It takes the main colors that are present in the wallpaper and creates a custom color palette for certain apps and UI elements. While Google’s own proprietary apps will be able to get the new color palette, non-Google apps will be slow to adopt it. This is where DarQ version 2.0 comes in.

DarQ is an app that brings dark mode to more apps

Most people prefer to have a dark mode in their apps, but not all apps have a native dark mode. This is where Kieron Quinn’s app, DarQ, comes in. It’s an app that basically forces apps into a dark mode. Unsurprisingly, it didn’t work 100% with every app, but for the apps that it did work for, it was great.

If you think that the app needs access to some deep system settings and assets, then you’d be right. It was launched to work on rooted devices. That’s how it was able to use the operating system as its own playground.

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DarQ version 2.0 will be able to force other apps to take on different color themes

Until now, DarQ’s only purpose was to force apps into dark mode, but DarQ version 2.0 has just launched, and looks like it will play nicely with Android 12’s Dynamic Color feature.

Quinn designed this version to work with Android 12’s Material You elements and the Monet color picker. DarQ version 2.0 still mainly revolves around forcing apps into dark mode, but you can dive into the developer settings. In the developer settings, you will see the option called “Monet Color Picker.”

At that point, you will be greeted by a selection of colors from your wallpaper. In the screenshot, we see three colors that could be chosen. You simply select the color that you want to have splashed over your apps.

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DarQ version 2.0 is very different from the previous version

DarQ version 2.0 was built from the ground up, and it really shows. In the release notes, Quinn stated that DarQ no longer uses the ADB script. Instead, it runs on the Shizuku script. It handles the service for non-root devices. For it to work, Shizuku needs to be run once per boot.

Folks who are on Android 10 or older would need to run Shizuku from their computer via ADB. People who have Android 11 or higher will be able to run Shizuku directly from their phone. At the time of writing this article, DarQ has some trouble running on Android 12.

Quinn says that it’s a bug with Shizuku, and it’s been fixed. He’s waiting for the fix to make it to the Play Store. If you want to try this app out for yourself, you can download it here at Kieron Quinn’s Github.

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