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Microsoft & Publishers Unite To Fight Against Google's Dominance

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Microsoft and Google are on the verge of a conflict, and Microsoft has decided to support newspapers against Google, CNN reports.

Conflicts between newspapers and big tech companies have peaked in recent years. Newspapers believe that technology companies that monopolize online advertising are influencing the flow of news. The recent Congressional hearing on Friday was about Google and Facebook’s impact on the news.

According to The Verge, the Congress bill is called “Journalism Competition and Preservation Act of 2021,” Its goal is to find a way to allow newspapers to monitor the distribution of their content on online platforms. Of course, reviewing the bill is not over yet, and there will be another hearing.

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Moreover, Congressman Ken Buck believes, “This bill is a step in the right direction to dethroning those digital kings.”

Conflicts arise between Microsoft and Google

The Congress bill has caused tension between Google and Microsoft. Following the bill, Microsoft has backed newspapers and strongly criticized Google’s online advertising monopoly.

At a written testimony to the House antitrust subcommittee, Microsoft President Brad Smith said: “The problems that beset journalism today are caused in part by a fundamental lack of competition in the search and ad tech markets that are controlled by Google,”

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Brad Smith added that this did not mean illegal actions by Google. But according to Microsoft’s experience, the side effects resulting from a company’s success may have a negative impact on the market and society. So the government needs to do something about it.

Its Google’s time to answer

As expected, Google was quick to respond to Microsoft’s statements. Google called Microsoft’s statements “self-serving claims” and attributed them to the company’s anti-Google policies.

“And it’s no coincidence that Microsoft’s newfound interest in attacking us comes on the heels of the SolarWinds attack and at a moment when they’ve allowed tens of thousands of their customers … to be actively hacked via major Microsoft vulnerabilities. So maybe it’s not surprising to see them dusting off the old diversionary Scroogled playbook,” Google SVP of Global Affairs Kent Walker noted in a blog post.

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 Everything started in Australia

Australia recently passed a law requiring tech companies operating in the country to pay publishers for their content. The law provoked a backlash from Google and Facebook, with Google even threatening to exit the Australian market.

But in return, Microsoft said it supports the new law and, unlike others, does not pose a threat to the Australian market. This is not the first time that Google faces conflicts with publishers. The recent EU laws made Google to close a deal with French publishers.