Motorola Razr Promo Video Reminds You To Be Gentle

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Motorola's foldable Razr (2019) is now available for pre-order. A new Motorola Razr foldable care promo reminds buyers how to take care of it.

Motorola Razr (2019) foldable care support video reminds you to be gentle

The company has a Motorola Razr foldable care support video for the device. In the 56-second video, Motorola gives a handful of instructions about how to care for it. First, Motorola says that "Razr is water repellant. Wipe with a dry cloth." The bending screen eventually showcases "bumps and lumps," which Motorola says "are normal." The screen itself has a protective coating, which buyers are to keep free of sharp objects. Using a screen protector is out of the question for the new Razr. And finally, Motorola says buyers need to close the phone before placing it in a pocket.

The meaning of the care support instructions

What do those Motorola instructions mean, really? Well, they reveal that the foldable Razr is fragile. Motorola says that bumps and lumps in the screen will come eventually. In other words, the screen will experience wear and tear. That shouldn't be a surprise to anyone, but some folks seem to think that the device will be as pristine as a normal smartphone in twelve months' time. Motorola is trying to prepare buyers for what to expect.

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Buyers will have to avoid using screen protectors. Motorola already has a protective coating on the device, and the use of a screen protector would only ruin it. The foldable Razr should close so that buyers can protect the screen. Closing the phone gives that satisfying "click" sound that popularized the pre-smartphone era. And yet, it's not the satisfying click sound that is the most important reason behind closing the device.

As with Samsung's Galaxy Fold, the foldable Razr will have to stay away from keys and sharp objects. This is no surprise, but it shows how the Razr is just as vulnerable as the Fold.

One important mistake Motorola makes is that it only gives the Razr water repellence. Water repellence amounts to little water and dust certification. Perhaps IP53 water and dust resistance is on board, but it's very little water and dust protection. Strong water and dust resistance is one protection that would make the first-generation Razr foldable less fragile.

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The care support instructions reveal that the foldable Razr is just as subject to fragility and wear and tear as Samsung's Galaxy Fold.

Where the foldable Motorola Razr (2019) learns from the Galaxy Fold

Though the foldable Razr is fragile, there are some things Motorola learns from the Galaxy Fold fiasco. For one, Motorola gives the Razr a protective coating. This is a step up from the Galaxy Fold's protective layer that was peeled off early Fold models. At that time, the protective covering was mistaken for an optional screen protector. The protective coating won't be mistaken for an optional screen protector.

Foldable Razr's clam-shell form factor a popular hardware hit

The truth is that foldables are new and are extremely fragile at this stage. The high price tag for the Razr ($1,500) and other foldable smartphones doesn't help, either. And yet, despite the fragility of the early foldables, and their high price tag, the clam-shell form factor will be an instant hit with buyers.

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The Galaxy Fold has 400,000-500,000 units sold under its wing, but the clam-shell foldables will still outsell all others. The clam-shell form factor is familiar and there are many who want a large screen with a more pocketable look and feel.

Some will buy the Razr and bet on the future (pre-orders are in full swing), but others will wait for the technology to catch up with it. Regardless of which choice buyers make, the care support video reminds them that the future is not quite here just yet.

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Staff News Writer

Deidre Richardson is a tech lover whose insatiable desire for all things tech has kept her in tech journalism some eight years now. She is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she earned BA degrees in both History and Music. Since graduating from Carolina in 2006, Richardson obtained a Master of Divinity degree and spent four years in postgraduate seminary studies. She's written five books since 2017 and all of them are available at Amazon. You can connect with Deidre Richardson on Facebook.

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