Can I Download Hulu Videos On Android & Watch Offline?

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Wondering if you can download videos from Hulu to watch offline on your Android device? Yes. Hulu now allows users to download video content for offline viewing.

However, the ability to do so depends on Hulu plan you're subscribed to. In addition, not all content available through Hulu is available to download.

Another caveat is that there are limits to how much you can download and how long content remains downloaded. We'll explain all of these points in this article.

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What Hulu plan can I download with?

Hulu offers two on-demand subscription plans. The first is the standard Hulu subscription priced at $5.99 per month. The second is the "No Ads" Hulu plan priced at $11.99 per month.

Hulu currently only allows subscribers to Hulu (No Ads) plan to download content. Therefore, if you are currently on the $5.99 per month plan you won't be able to download any videos on an Android device.

Hulu offers a live TV streaming service called Hulu + Live TV for $44.99 per month. This live TV plan comes with the ad-supported version of Hulu on-demand. Due to this, subscribers to this plan cannot download content for offline viewing. This applies to both live TV and on-demand videos.

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Hulu does have another version of its live TV package priced at $50.99 per month. The Hulu + Live TV (No Ads) plan is the same live TV package but coupled with the No Ads version of Hulu. Subscribers to this plan can download content available through the Hulu (No Ads) catalog.

How do I download shows on Hulu?

Hulu does not allow all content to be downloaded. However, identifying which videos can be downloaded is fairly simply. Any Hulu video that you can download will show a download icon beside each episode. Tapping on that icon starts the download process.

The easiest way to check for content is to simply perform a search within the Android app for a specific title. Again, if a download icon is present, it can be downloaded.

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Alternatively, the Android app now comes with a "see what's downloadable" section. As the name suggests, here you'll find all the content that you can download grouped together.

Where are my Hulu downloads stored?

When Hulu made downloads available to Android users, it also updated the Android app.

As long as a user is running a newer version of the app, the bottom navigation bar will list five options: Home, My Stuff, Downloads, Search and Account.

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Tapping on the Downloads options will take you to your download library. If there are no downloads in the section, or they have expired already, the user can tap the "see what's downloadable" section to download videos.

How long do my downloads last?

Like most services that let you download content, there's a time limit in effect. Once a video is downloaded, the user has thirty days to watch it before it is deleted.

However, if the content has been part-played, then things change. After playback has been started the user only has 48 hours left to watch the video before it is deleted.

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Of course, even if either the 48-hour or 30-day time-limit expires, users can simply download the show again once online. This is dependent on the show still being available through Hulu.

Is there a download limit with Hulu?

Yes, Hulu does not let you download an endless number of videos. Instead, Hulu limits the number of downloads on an Android device to 25 at one time.

Once a user has 25 titles stored on their device they will need to delete some of the videos to make room for newer ones.

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It's also worth noting this 25 title limit is a total limit. For example, if two devices are linked to the same Hulu account, the download limit is split across the two devices.

Overall, Hulu allows users to download on up to five Android devices in total.

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Editor-in-Chief

John has been writing about and reviewing tech products since 2014 after making the transition from writing about and reviewing airlines. With a background in Psychology, John has a particular interest in the science and future of the industry. Besides adopting the Managing Editor role at AH John also covers much of the news surrounding audio and visual tech, including cord-cutting, the state of Pay-TV, and Android TV. Contact him at [email protected]

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