Facebook Kills Three Apps Due To Low User Count

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Facebook has announced that it will be shutting down three applications within the next few weeks – Hello, tbh, and Moves. The social media giant stated that these apps will be shut down due to relatively low usage. Hello is a caller ID tool that combines information gathered from Facebook with contact details stored in one's device and is targeted at users in Brazil, the United States, and Nigeria. On the other hand, the tbh app is an anonymous polling tool that caters to high school students in the United States and was only acquired by the social media giant late last year. Meanwhile, the Moves app was launched in 2014 as a fitness tracking service that records one's daily activity.

Facebook said that it will be depreciating the Moves app and its accompanying API by July 31, while the Hello app will be shut down within the next few weeks. However, the social media firm did not provide details on when the tbh app will be discontinued. The tech juggernaut also noted that all user data from the three applications will be deleted within the next 90 days.

The discontinuation of the three applications is part of a regular review process at the company. Facebook constantly reviews all services it offers and aims to prioritize those that more people value. The company recently confirmed that it may have to shut down applications or services with relatively low usage to allocate its resources toward other features that more people rely on. Aside from the three applications, another example of a service that Facebook recently shut down is its M virtual assistant which was only available to around 2,000 users living in the state of California. However, even though the social media giant may shut down underperforming applications or services, their features may later be merged with other products. For example, the M Suggestions platform which was part of the M virtual assistant is still available within Facebook Messenger on Android, iOS, and desktop browsers.

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