TwrpBuilder Lets Root Users Request Unofficial TWRP Ports

There's a brand new application, called TwrpBuilder, which was recently released to XDA Developers with the goal of allowing users to request an unofficial TWRP port for their device. For those who may not already be aware, TeamWin Recovery Project (TWRP) is a widely popular recovery tool used to create custom recovery images for the purpose of rooting an Android handset or tablet. Of course, as with most apps tied into the process, there are a few prerequisites before the app can be used. Namely, users will need to have the latest version of Play Store installed and, for older devices, BusyBox installed. Root access is yet another requirement of the process, which allows a recovery image to be made and sent to the developers.

That is, after all, how this app works. It effectively acts as a gateway between developers and users. Through TwrpBuilder, users can request a TWRP port for devices that aren't currently officially supported by TWRP. As such, this really isn't an application intended for those that aren't already completely comfortable with the process of rooting devices and installing custom ROMs and hardware. The developers have a brief disclaimer on the app's description, indicating that they are not liable for malfunctioning apps or bricked devices. Moreover, the devs are upfront that not all images will even boot and that they don't add a TWRP release to their repository until it has been proven to work.

Having said all of that, it's worth repeating that these kinds of tools are intended for use by advanced users. This is not an everyday, run-of-the-mill app. TwrpBuilder also points out that it isn't related to the official TWRP team in any way, shape, or form. However, for those users who are comfortable with these kinds of tools and who have been waiting for official TWRP support for a still-unsupported smartphone or tablet, this may prove to be an extremely useful tool. As mentioned above, there is also a substantial list of devices which unofficial recovery images have already been made for. As of this writing, there are more than 90. Those can be found by navigating to the source link below. Anybody interested in checking it out for themselves, meanwhile, only needs to click the button below.

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Daniel Golightly

Senior Staff Writer
Daniel has been writing for AndroidHeadlines since 2016. As a Senior Staff Writer for the site, Daniel specializes in reviewing a diverse range of technology products and covering topics related to Chrome OS and Chromebooks. Daniel holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Software Engineering and has a background in Writing and Graphics Design that drives his passion for Android, Google products, the science behind the technology, and the direction it's heading. Contact him at [email protected]
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