Google's Fuchsia OS Test Version Available In-Browser Now

Google's Fuchsia OS has popped up again in a testable format for use in any browser, allowing anybody with web access to check it out for themselves. Fucshia OS, at least as seen via this test, appears to function similarly to a cross between Android and Chrome OS. In reality, it's really not either. In fact, it's not even based on the same kernel. Both of the former are built on top of Linux while Fuchsia is developed from the ground up on a brand new Google-built Zircon microkernel called Magenta. The result appears to be a stunningly simple, lightweight OS that can get a lot done without taking up too many resources.

Having said that, it would be easy to get confused since the whole system is built around the Material Design "cards" that have become such a mainstay for Google products. The demo itself actually highlights that very well but is not complete by any stretch of the imagination. Although all of the animations and available interactions are exceptionally well done, all of the applications are empty. Those are accessible by clicking on cards in the browser version of Fuchsia but there's just empty white space aside from a solid color bar and the word "content." The buttons inside of those apps are not, however. In the bottom left is a circular navigation button to get back to the home screen. Clicking on the time at the bottom left loads up settings and a system user menu similar to that found on Chrome OS. The same menu can be accessed via the center icon on the home page but none of the options do much, aside from the sign-out button. Google Assistant is present as well, just above the app cards.

This is absolutely not the first time the search giant's own OS has been revealed in a testable format, however. It previously showed up as a bootable native program available for Google's high-dollar Chromebook, the Pixelbook. However, this particular test, for the time being, can be virtually run in any web browser on what should be any device. Whether or not this test is really meant to be public, however, is really not clear. So there's no telling how long it will be available and anybody who wants to check it out will probably want to click the button below to see it for themselves.

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