Red Tint Fix Hitting Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8 Plus On Telus

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus flagships have an issue with some units showing a bit more red tint on the screen than they likely should, and now the fix that Samsung created to remedy that problem is seemingly rolling out to Telus customers. According to Telus's update chart, the software packed started rolling out to Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus units on the company's network on Monday. Telus did not announce exactly how the rollout will be performed, or how long it will take for the update to be available to all users, though the company implied that the update won't ship with any other improvements save for the red tint fix.

The red tint fix in question is a fairly simple one as it only adjusts the phone's color balance in much the same way that users could do themselves through the device's Settings app. The display settings contain options for tint, color temperature, and color balance, all of which can be adjusted manually. Normally, the setting is used to adjust the screen's color calibration to fit a user's preference or certain types of content, though it seems that some units of the Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8 Plus were shipped with wrongly calibrated screens, though Samsung insists that the problem isn't a hardware defect.

Samsung's update for the red tint issue has already rolled out across multiple carriers and territories, with Telus and Bell being the first carriers in Canada to get the update. To date, it's rolled out in Samsung's homeland of South Korea, the United States, Europe, and India. Samsung's goal is to distribute the update to all Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus units worldwide as quickly as possible. While the bug is correctable through user-accessible inputs with no special setup needed, Samsung's solution does the job automatically and brings screens to the same optimal neutral values that they were supposed to be set to. The issue itself is reportedly caused by a bug in software calibration of the screen's color balance during manufacturing, which is why it appears sporadically across certain units and is easily correctable.

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Daniel Fuller

Senior Staff Writer
Daniel has been writing for Android Headlines since 2015, and is one of the site's Senior Staff Writers. He's been living the Android life since 2010, and has been interested in technology of all sorts since childhood. His personal, educational and professional backgrounds in computer science, gaming, literature, and music leave him uniquely equipped to handle a wide range of news topics for the site. These include the likes of machine learning, voice assistants, AI technology development, and hot gaming news in the Android world. Contact him at [email protected]
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