Report: 4% Of Uber Drivers Were Uber Drivers A Year Before

It seems Uber is not currently able to retain a significant number of its drivers over the long term. Based on a report from The Information this week (which in turn credits data seen by the publication), Uber has only managed to retain 4-percent of the drivers that it had on its books a year before. Which by any measure, is a significant drop in driver retention levels.

However, it seems the reasoning as to why so many drivers sign up and then leave again so soon, is less straightforward - or at least, less singular. Over the past few months Uber has hit the headlines on a number of occasions for reasons to do with how it engages and works with its drivers. So it has become clear that there is some level of disconnect between drivers and the company in general. While competition is rising from competitors (who might offer an Uber driver a better working relationship and/or environment), the report highlights that “people involved with the company’s efforts” are confirming that Uber is working on improving its relationship with drivers.

One of the measures reportedly on the cards for consideration is the ability to allow allow drivers the option to receive tips. Which in itself is an aspect that hit the headlines in the last week, when New York regulators raised the possibility of forcing Uber to offer tipping as an option for its drivers. Another way in which it is reported that Uber will look to improve driver conditions (more specially, improve driver pay), is to encourage drivers to drive longer distances to reach a rider who might only be looking for a short trip. This seems to be one of the prevailing issues for Uber drivers and the report highlights that Uber is looking at ways in which it can compensate drivers in these instances. The one overriding aspect surfacing from this report is that Uber seems to be focusing on ways to improve pay in the hope that will in turn improve the relationship it has with its drivers. Although based on the reports that have hit the headlines in the last few months, pay might not be the only issue drivers have with the company, or why they have left.

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About the Author
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John Anon

Editor-in-Chief
John has been writing about and reviewing tech products since 2014 after making the transition from writing about and reviewing airlines. With a background in Psychology, John has a particular interest in the science and future of the industry. Besides adopting the Managing Editor role at AH John also covers much of the news surrounding audio and visual tech, including cord-cutting, the state of Pay-TV, and Android TV. Contact him at [email protected]
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