Wikileaks Reveals CIA Targets Android Devices And Smart TVs

Wikileaks has published a set of documents dubbed "Vault7" which appear to show a number of CIA hacks targeted at Android devices and Samsung Smart TVs. The publication, which contains 8,761 documents and files, are all reportedly CIA-related and appear to list a number of exploits and hacks used by the CIA. Now, while the CIA doesn't solely target Android devices, it appears this is where the agency has mainly succeeded, with a total of 24 different weaponized exploits being listed in the files. The CIA hasn't limited itself to Android-powered mobile devices, though, with other published exploits pointing towards the hacking of Samsung's Smart TVs, iPads, iPhones, PCs and even routers. The files, which not only list ways of hacking into the devices, also detail how to remove any identifying IP addresses, along with any other useful information.

According to the documents, the company has utilized malware to hack into Samsung Smart TVs and Windows PCs in order to convert them into microphones. Samsung's Smart TVs currently include an always-on voice command system, something that the CIA appears to have taken advantage of. By hacking into the TV's microphones, the CIA then uses malware in order to transmit the conversation over to a CIA server via Wi-Fi. While not all of the hacks are reserved for smart TVs, it appears that, although devices are claimed to be more secure than ever by manufacturers, the CIA is taking advantage of the new and more advanced hardware features that devices have built-in in order to collect "necessary" information.

Aside from everyday hacks, though, it appears the CIA's software has become so sophisticated that they are able to hack into Android and iPhone software that has previously run presidential Twitter accounts. All of this is possible through many "zero-day" exploits. Perhaps the most worrying part, though, is the fact that Wikileaks claims the agency has been developing tools that could remotely control vehicle software, therefore being able to cause "accidents" whenever the agency deems "necessary." Lastly, though, and possibly the most worrying part, is the fact that "Vault7" is only a small part of what will be a series of leaks. Wikileaks has confirmed that more files will be published over time, so it should only be a matter of time before the full scale of the CIA's hacking work is uncovered and what consequences these leaks will have.

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