Events Return To Google+ Alongside Comment Moderation

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Events have returned to Google+ alongside a new comment moderation option that allows the owners of any profiles or pages to ensure that everyone who is engaging with their posts is able to enjoy the conversation. Comment moderation has been a highly requested feature and with the latest Google+ update Google has seen fit to make it possible to hide "low-quality" comments so that only those which have the most meaning can be viewed.

While preventing a great conversation in any post from potentially going south and turning into a toxic as well as negative environment, the comment moderation also makes it possible to put focus on engaging the most meaningful comments. Of course, Google also gives control over when the comments can be viewed and you can simply change things back to a visible state at any point in time by clicking or tapping on the overflow menu of each post, and then tapping on the "see all comments" option. It's also worth noting that low-quality comments are hidden by default.

With any social networks and feeds, it might be important for users to have some way of getting a number of their friends and family members to meet for a collective gathering. Google+ had the option to create events at one point in time but it was later removed, and now it's back as Google has just reintroduced it with this update. That being said, the ability to create and join events will only be possible from the web version of Google+ and G Suite customers won't have this option as it's only available for personal accounts. Events also won't officially go live until January 24th. In addition to both of these changes, Google+ on the web also now allows users to zoom in on images, and they've slightly altered the UI a bit to show more posts and less white space, so if you're seeing three rows of posts instead of two then this is a result of the update. Google notes that this was an effort to help users make the most of the screen size they have when browsing through Google+, so it's entirely possible that users who don't have a fairly large display will still see two rows of posts, while those with larger displays will see three.

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