Batteries Are Not To Blame For The Galaxy Note 7 Fiasco?

Advertisement
Advertisement

According to a report which surfaced a couple of days ago, Samsung plans to announce the Galaxy Note 7 probe results by the end of this month. Well, a new report just surfaced, and it's suggesting that the device's battery did not have anything to do with the whole fiasco. According to this report, both the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus will be fueled by batteries provided by Samsung SDI, Samsung's company which manufactured battery packs for the Galaxy Note 7 as well.

Previous rumors claimed that Samsung is looking to get batteries from third-party manufacturers, but according to this report, that won't be the case. That actually made sense because the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus launches are extremely important for Samsung, and the company cannot afford to have any battery issues with those two devices, the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco created more than enough damage for Samsung already. So, why is Samsung using Samsung SDI's batteries yet again? Well, it is possible that batteries did not have anything to do with the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco, which is something we'll find out later this month. So, what went wrong with the Galaxy Note 7 if batteries are not to blame? Well, some rumors were claiming that 'strategic defect' is to blame for all that, in other words, it is possible Samsung made a mistake and did not leave enough room inside of the phone for heat dissipation, which could have caused the Galaxy Note 7 to explode, of course. If that's the case, then that's a rookie mistake by the company, but we'll see.

In addition to the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus, it seems like Samsung also plans to use Samsung SDI's batteries in the 2017 Galaxy A3, Galaxy A5 and Galaxy A7 smartphones. The battery inside of the Galaxy A7 (2017) actually has a 20% higher capacity than the unit used in the Galaxy Note 7, both batteries are 3,600mAh units by the way. This info is very interesting, that's for sure, we doubt Samsung would gamble by using Samsung SDI's batteries in all of these devices if they're not sure that batteries are not to blame for the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco. It is, of course, possible that the company already removed all issues with Samsung SDi's battery packs and what not, but chances are battery packs are not to blame.

Advertisement