Rumor: Samsung To Create Proprietary Headphone Port

Apple switched gears with the latest iPhone 7 and as many readers are aware of, the Cupertino-giant has abandoned the 3.5-millimeter headphone standard in favor of its own in-house Lightning connector. This move was preceded by numerous rumors on the matter so it didn’t take the industry by surprise, but how Apple’s decision will affect the Android market remains to be seen. Nevertheless, according to a new rumor passed along by unnamed sources of Digital Music News, Apple’s decision to ditch the 3.5-millimeter headphone jack has persuaded Samsung into considering a similar solution of its own.

Throughout the year several Android smartphones - including the Moto Z series - have adopted the new USB Type-C connector for streaming audio signals as opposed to utilizing the 3.5-millimeter analog port, and this has happened before the iPhone 7 was official. Needless to say, more Android smartphone makers are likely to follow the same path with their future products, but as far as Samsung is concerned, rumors have it that the South Korean company is considering borrowing a page from Apple’s playbook and building its own proprietary headphone port. Interestingly enough, the rumors suggest that Samsung’s view on the matter is to create a proprietary port that could be licensed to other Android manufacturers for using on their smartphones. However, the benefits of this mysterious proprietary port are unknown, so if the rumors are correct there’s no way to determine what could convince other smartphone manufacturers to abandon both the 3.5-millimeter headphone jack and the USB Type-C connector in favor of Samsung’s proprietary solution. With that being said, the idea that Samsung might create an in-house headphone port sounds rather far-fetched, but the rumors only suggest that Samsung is currently “exploring” this idea, which seems quite reasonable given that Apple – Samsung’s biggest rival in the smartphone market – is moving away from 3.5-millimeter jacks.

On the other hand, Samsung doesn’t have nearly the same influence over the whole Android ecosystem compared to Apple and its own iOS environment, so a drastic change such as developing a proprietary headphone jack might only hurt Samsung. There are always other Android smartphone alternatives on the market if one flagship fails to tick the buyer’s boxes, and once again, Android smartphone makers can technically already make the jump from 3.5-millimeter headphone jacks to USB Type-C connectors without needing a proprietary port. In closing, keep a proverbial pinch of salt nearby until more details on the matter emerge; assuming of course that there will be anything new to report on the matter in the future.

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