Sprint Launches "Unlimited Freedom" Plan, Starting at $60

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This morning, T-Mobile decided to go all in with unlimited plans and launched their T-Mobile ONE plan. Bringing unlimited data to everyone for $70 for single lines and $40 per line for a family of four. Of course, there are plenty of caveats here with T-Mobile's plan. But that didn't stop Sprint from firing back with their own plan. Just minutes after John Legere and T-Mobile announced their new plan – part of their next Un-carrrier movement 'Un-carrier 12' – Sprint and Marcelo Claure announced Unlimited Freedom.

With Sprint's new Unlimited Freedom plan, you can get a single line for just $60. The second line will be $40 and lines 3-10 are $30 per month. Meaning that a family of four could get unlimited data for $160 per month, the same price as T-Mobile is offering under their T-Mobile ONE plan. Sprint is also doing "mobile optimized video", video will be shown at 480p with game streams being capped at 2Mbps and music at 500Kbps. Sprint is saying that this is a much better deal than what AT&T has – who only offers unlimited data if you sign up for U-Verse or DIRECTV – and of course better than T-Mobile's new plan.

That's not all though, Boost Mobile's new unlimited plan starts tomorrow. It'll be a bit cheaper, coming in at $50/month for the first line and $30/month for the second line and that's for a total of five lines. If you're on Boost Mobile and don't want unlimited data, the prepaid carrier is also unveiling a new $30 plan that will net you a gigabit of data. You can add more for just $10 per gigabit. If you need 3GB, you might as well get the unlimited plan that they are starting tomorrow. As it will mean you won't have to count your data and worry about getting throttled.

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Sprint isn't saying when they'll start throttle users that are using excessive amounts of data, but it'll likely be around 20GB of data per month. Considering AT&T throttles at 21GB and T-Mobile will throttle at 26GB. This is to keep the network experience a good one for everyone. Instead of having a handful of users using up all of the bandwidth on their towers.