OnePlus 3 Survives 750 feet High Crash Test Intact

OnePlus 3 has been making headlines in the Android smartphone industry for all the right reasons. OnePlus is keen on declaring war with the major players in the market, and they are winning. In a video recently uploaded, the OnePlus 3 is shown to charge faster than the Samsung Galaxy S7 by about 14 percent at the same time. The Chinese company isn’t holding back from showcasing the phone’s strengths either. The OnePlus India YouTube Channel has uploaded a video showing how the new flagship phone survives a 230 meter (750 feet) drop from the air.

Drop tests are a popular way of highlighting the phone’s durability for every manufacturer or reviewer, and every phone goes through the trial at some point in time, intentionally or not. Drops are also one of the major contributing factors to the smartphones getting damaged: the display first and then the internal components, depending upon the height and the surface. Keeping this in mind, OnePlus has often touted the strength and durability of their new flagship OnePlus 3. Built from a solid slab of space grade Aluminium and protected by the Corning Gorilla Glass 4, the OnePlus 3 boasts of an impressive durability against falls without compromising on the weight of the device.

And now, OnePlus themselves are out to prove their claims. The 5-minute long video was shot on 29th July, at Mimizan, France. As depicted in the video, the phone is dropped from an aircraft hovering at a height of around 230 meters (750 ft.) and the descent of the phone as it crashes on the ground is recorded. The phone lands face down on a grassy plain, and when examined for damage, it is intact except for a few scratches. The phone turns on like normal, the camera works perfectly, and all the apps seem to be opening which is quite a surprise given the height of the fall. Although the surface was not concrete or asphalt, the height is enough to cause internal component damage, which did not show up in the OnePlus 3, thus proving its resilience to impact. The Chinese start-up received its share of criticism for replacing the signature sandstone back with an aluminum unibody, making it look more generic in the process. But the move seems to have paid off.

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About the Author
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Debarshi Nayak

Intern Writer
Tech addict, artist and musician. If you don't find him typing away at his desktop which he fondly calls Venus, he's probably out looking for constellations or being a book worm. Occasional DOTA 2 player. He has an avid interest for any sort of work of literature. And watches anime in his free time. Owns a Galaxy Note 3, and a One Plus One
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