Sponsored Game Review: Twistago

Twistago is an Android board game that puts players in charge of their own mini army of Aliens, and they need to try and get them all back to the mothership safely. Twistago is a game that, somewhat unsurprisingly, revolves around needing to twist certain parts of the game board, imagine a gameplay area that has all sorts of gears moving together and you'll know what Twistago is about. Players can twist one piece on the game board just once - twice for special Commander pieces - and there are power cores that help to keep the gameplay fresh as well. Twisting in the right order and using some sort of strategy is what makes Twistago such a challenge. Not only that, but this is a game that's designed to be played with as many as four players, with other real people using a pass-n-play method or against the computer. A great game for board game fans looking for something a little more modern. Is Twistago your next favorite?

Board game fans looking for Twistago can download it from the Play Store. There's no free or trial version available, which might put some users off, but if you like your board games then this is something you at least give a try. Once installed and launched, players will be introduced to the game after the title screen.

In a nutshell, players need to move their Aliens around on the game board by twisting the tiles one-by-one. Each tile links to another and you'll have to use some strategic brain power to make sure that you make the right moves. Twistago does a great job of educating players how the game is actually played, including explaining how the power cores work.

This is something that a lot of players will appreciate, and it's simple - yet informative - tutorials like these that get the job done without annoying eager players. The power cores are a simple, yet intriguing addition to the game overall. They offer players a way to earn more points as well as quickly get Aliens back to the mothership by allowing players to send them home via the central Black Hole. Every game must come to an end as well as declare one of the players a winner, which is thankfully explained by the tutorial as well.

When I started to play the game for real, I was impressed with the overall feel of the game. Sure, this is a board game with a slightly slower pace to it than most players would ask for, but its considered gameplay is something that I took to quite well.

I first started off playing one-on-one against the computer, and I suggest this to new players just to get used to the controls as well as the pacing. It can be a little frustrating waiting for your next turn when you're close to making a key move, and even more frustrating when the computer or an opponent comes along and ruins this setup with a key move of their own. This frustration however, is what helps make Twistago such a compelling game.

Things can get even more interesting when players decide to either bring in more computer opponents or ask their friends to play, which is easily done from the settings menu.

As you can see, a game board with the full four players does seem a little crowded, and it's true that these games will take a lot longer, but this is also part of the charm of the game. There are more ways to be tripped by both the computer or your fellow human players, leading to a tough challenge that most board game fans will be more than happy with.

Chaos is not quite the word I would use, but it can become even more frustrating then I mentioned earlier when there are more teams involved. Even more so with human players; humans can be spiteful when playing a game like this and if they can see the screen when you take your move, they will likely mess up your next move purely because they can. Of course, this is part of why we play challenging mind games like these: nobody would enjoy this sort of thing if it was "fair" or if it were too easy.

After spending quite a lot of time with Twistago, I can see why many players would enjoy the game, and why many others wouldn't. Without doubt, this is not a game for casual players or those that have little to no experience with board games. That might seem obvious, and while Twistago is certainly pretty easy to get started with, its gameplay is the sort of thing that could drive some players mad. Still, no game is designed to be too easy, and Twistago is a new game that does what a lot of other simply can't: make the board game feel modern and relevant. The sci-fi style and setting will appeal to younger players, and the game is sort of timeless in a way. It has all the classic gameplay we know and love from board games, but doesn't feel dated or a whimsical celebration of old; it feels fresh and modern while also being familiar.

Ratings

  • Speed (4/5) - Everything in Twistago runs nice and smoothly and the pacing is nice and easy, too.
  • Theme (4/5) - I think this sci-fi style is going to appeal a lot of younger players as well as the more modern audience that it's going for.
  • Features (4/5) - With tough computer opponents, Twistago is a fun challenge. It only gets better however, when players play against one another using the pass-n-play system. A board game that is both a modern breath of fresh air and a way of bringing people together, Twistago ticks a lot of boxes.
  • Overall (4/5) - As board games go, Twistago is one of the few that has managed to make the genre feel fresh and fun again. It's frustrating, challenging and great fun all rolled into one.

Pros

  • Great tutorial does a brilliant job of making sure players know exactly how to play the game properly.
  • Players have the option of playing with just one computer or as many as three opponents as well as change their skill level, too.
  • Power cores help to add to the strategy without making the game confusing or anything like that.
  • Brings back human interaction by letting players use a pass-n-play method to play against each other at the same time.

Cons

  • Could be considered a little too expensive for what the game has to offer.
  • • Doesn't include online multiplayer, leaving players on their own to play against the computer opponents. However, a multiplayer mode is planned as a future extension.

Twistago is one of the few modern board games that manages to be familiar to fans of the genre, without making things seem boring or dated in any way. It has all of the frustration and challenges that a good board game should have and the modern graphics as well as setting should make this a game that fans of all ages (from six and above, at least) should find compelling and great fun.

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About the Author
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Tom Dawson

Former Editor-in-Chief
For years now I've had a heavy interest in technology, growing up with 8-bit computers and gaming consoles has fed into an addiction to everything that beeps. Android saved me from the boredom of iOS years ago and I love watching the platform grow. As an avid reader and writer nothing pleases me more than to write about the exciting world of Android, Google and mobile technology as a whole.
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