Research Highlights Phone Radiation & Cancer Link In Rats

Details of new research paper were published yesterday. The headline aspect being that a connection was found between some forms of cancer and the radiation associated with cell phones. This has always been a topic for concern for devices like cell phones and while the general consensus is that there is a low risk of cancer-related issues with the use of cell phones, this latest report does prove to be interesting reading.

The study was undertaken by the National Toxicology Program, took place over a period of two years and at a cost of $25 million to fund. The study focused on the effects of cell phone radiation on rats. The research was conducted by using an experimental group of rats (those which were exposed to the cell phone radiation) and a control group (those which were not). The findings indicated that the experimental group saw a higher correlation with two types of tumors (heart and brain), compared to the control group. Therefore, noting a relationship between cell phone radiation and cancer.

However, while the study does add to the literature on the topic and will prove to be cause for further research, there are some notably aspects which are in play. Firstly, the most obvious one, this was researched conducted on rats and does not necessarily transpose to humans. So while the findings do suggest there could be a relationship between certain types of cancer and cell phone radiation, it does only suggest this in the case of rats. Not to mention, the same study does seem to suggest that not all rats responded in the same way. For instance, the study only found a correlation between male rats. There was no association (at least to a significant value) with tested female rats. And the rats which did show a reaction, were said to have exhibited a “low incident” reaction. So while the findings are interesting and do add to growing literature on the topic and especially considering the size, scale and cost of this particular research, they are by no means conclusive or to be taken as a direct observation on the use of mobile phones by humans. Although, this is certainly likely to open the door to more research on the topic.

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About the Author
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John Anon

Editor-in-Chief
John has been writing about and reviewing tech products since 2014 after making the transition from writing about and reviewing airlines. With a background in Psychology, John has a particular interest in the science and future of the industry. Besides adopting the Managing Editor role at AH John also covers much of the news surrounding audio and visual tech, including cord-cutting, the state of Pay-TV, and Android TV. Contact him at [email protected]
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