Android N To Be Named After Indian Dessert 'Neyyappam'?

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Google has already announced that the name of the next full-release version of Android would start with the letter 'N', but although the search giant has already released three 'Developer Preview' versions of the upcoming Android N, we're still no closer to knowing for certain the eventual name of its next-generation mobile operating system. Anybody who knows the first thing about Android knows full well that Google tends to name its Android versions after desserts and sweets in alphabetical order, which is why over the years, we've had the likes of Cupcake, Donut, Éclair, Froyo (Fried Yogurt), Gingerbread, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich, Jelly Bean, KitKat, Lollipop and Marshmallow as names of various iterations of the world's most popular mobile OS.

Now that we're down to the 14th letter of the English alphabet, netizens have been passionately debating about the possible names of the next full-release version of Android. While the possible nomenclature was being hotly-debated a while back, the chatter around the Google I/O earlier this month had more to do with the features of Android N and the changes it brings to the end-user, rather than the usual online flame-wars about the possibility of one option getting the better of another. Meanwhile, with speculations regarding the name of the next big Android version on in full swing, several options are already being thrown around online.

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While 'Nougat' and 'Nutella' were two of the early favorites, a relatively newer entrant to the growing list has everybody scrambling dictionaries and recipe books. Many believe that the next version of Android could well be named after a South Indian dessert called 'Neyyappam'. Online reports seem to claim that 'Neyyappam' happens to be a traditional sweetmeat from the Southern state of Kerala, and is a deep-fried dessert made out of rice and jaggery. It is currently the most popular option in Google's online poll, which was started earlier this month to involve members of the public in the whole naming process. It remains to be seen, though, whether Google goes ahead with what could well be a bit of tongue-twister for many around the world, at least, until they're familiar with the pronunciation. The online poll will close on June 9th and interested parties will have until then to swing the result one way or another.