Chrome 64-Bit for Windows to Bring Enhanced Security and Speed According to Google

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If you're a Chrome user and have been for any length of time now, you probably know just how good the browser has gotten.  Once upon a time Google just promised that Chrome was a faster browser, but other browsers like Internet Explorer and Firefox had better compatibility with websites all over the web.  Nowadays it's the exact opposite in pretty much every category.  Chrome is the most used browser on the Internet, and for darn good reason.  It's got oodles of extensions that range from games to apps, utilities and all sorts of other fantastic things.  The biggest problem with Chrome anymore is speed, and if you're using it on anything but a top-end computer you probably know exactly what I'm talking about.  Chrome seems to come to a screeching halt if you're doing too much, something that never used to be a problem with the browser, but Google is vowing that this has finally been fixed with its new 64-bit Chrome browser.

More than likely if you're using a computer that's newer than 4 years old or so you're running a 64-bit version of Windows, and that means you're a perfect candidate to update to 64-bit Chrome as well.  64-bit Chrome brings extended data processing capabilities among other enhancements as well, including better security that's promising closed security holes and better protection against hacking.  If you've ever tried to use any 64-bit software though you know that there are simply compatibility issues with other software on the system, in this case extensions that users may have been enjoying for years.  Adobe Flash is built in to Chrome, which means support for that aging web tech is still going to be around, but extension developers will have to build new versions of their apps to support the 64-bit ecosystem.

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There's also support for higher resolution displays, including HiDPI mode on Mac's that feature Retina displays, but the Mac version is still a work in progress and hasn't been given the final go-ahead by the Chrome team for public release.  Google is citing a 15% increase in rendering and overall speed of Chrome, and less crashes to the renderer as well, making this quite possibly the most stable version of Chrome yet.  For those of us out there that have been facing serious speed issues in Chrome for a long time now, this release is hopefully what we're looking for to fix the problem that's been going on for a very long time now.  Check out the Google source link below for the 64-bit download if you've got a 64-bit version of Windows.