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Q1 Saw 292 Million Smartphones Ship, Signs of Slower Growth

April 20, 2016 - Written By Tom Dawson

With all these new smartphones being launched during the first part of the year, it can be easy to forget to think whether or not smartphones in general are even selling anymore. Obviously they are, but in what sort of numbers and how is the growth rate for the future looking? Well, for the most part things are looking okay, but the growth at which the smartphone market is growing is starting to slow down, which is far from surprising at this late stage, and probably not a cause for concern.

Figures put together from TrendForce put global smartphone shipments for Q1 at 292 Million units. That’s down 18.6% sequentially, but considering Q4 is often referred to as the “Golden Quarter” it’s far from surprising to this sort of drop. What is interesting however is that figures for Q1 2016 fell by 1.3% compared to Q1 2015, and while this is a small drop it’s a drop nonetheless and one that could lead to a pretty poor 2016 for the smartphone industry overall. Growth is set to fall below double-digits for the first time ever, and many forecasts from firms and analysts throughout the land have been dropped after these Q1 figures.

In terms of big name Android vendors, Samsung’s share of 292 Million was 81 Million units, itself up 2.5% sequentially, beating their Q4 figures. Meanwhile in China, Xiaomi managed to ship 16 Million smartphones, and Huawei shipped an impressive 27 Million units, giving them the top spot in China. Apple and Samsung continue to battle for first place, but China’s Huawei has managed an impressive third place globally, which is nothing to be sniffed at. TrendForce sees Samsung shipping a whopping 318 Million smartphones throughout 2016, while forecasts for other players have shifted somewhat and Apple is expected to ship as much as 15 Million units below the previous year. Further reports and figures from the manufacturers themselves should come in throughout the year and help paint a more complete picture, but for now things look just fine, even if growth is set to slip below double-digits for the first time ever, these are figures that are still very respectable in their own right.