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Google Trends show 62% of Searches for Sanders in New York

April 19, 2016 - Written By Alexander Maxham

It’s the middle of the primary season for selecting a new president. What this means – for those that may not know, or don’t live in the US – is that candidates are running to win the party nomination. With Donald Trump in the lead for the Republican party and Hilary Clinton in the lead for the Democratic party, before the big showdown in November. This week, the primary is being held in New York, both parties held their debates in Brooklyn last week. Results of the Primary aren’t out just yet, but we should hear about them later on tonight. However right now, it appears that search interest is in favor of Vermont Senator, Bernie Sanders.

Google Trends shows the trends in searches over a specific time frame. Google Trends recently put out a picture of what it looks like right now in the New York area during the primary. Bernie Sanders is commanding about 62% of searches in regards to the election, with Hilary Clinton commanding the other 38%. These are searches with the term “How to vote for” in them. While this may not depict how the election will turn out, when polls close later this evening, it is a pretty interesting stat for Bernie Sanders. Who is currently behind Clinton in electoral votes needed to win the nomination.

Now on the Republican side, Google Trends shows that Donald Trump is in the lead for searches conducted in the past 24 hours. With Trump at 61%, Ted Cruz at 25% and John Kasich at 14%, which is currently the landscape for the primaries so far on the republican side. Trump has a pretty sizeable lead over Ted Cruz in electoral votes, but it’s still anyone’s game right now.

Google Trends also has some other pretty interesting stats when it comes to the primary. Including what foods users who searched for Donald Trump also searched for. This is gearing up to be one of the more interesting presidential elections in recent memory (although with them only happening every 4 years, there’s not many in “recent memory”). If you’re interested in this type of data, you’ll want to give Google Trends Twitter account a follow. Some real interesting data is available there.