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Galaxy S6 & Galaxy Note 5 Now Run Samsung Beta Music Player

April 7, 2016 - Written By Dominik Bosnjak

Samsung’s very own Android music app hit Google Play Store mere days after its two latest flagship devices – Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge – launched in the US on March 11th. Though the said piece of mobile software didn’t come preinstalled on the Galaxy S7 series by default, these are the only two devices that it initially supported. Well, until now, that is. As it turns out, the South Korean company has big plans for its music app and is currently in the process of expanding support to older Samsung devices, as well.  As of recently, Samsung Music also supports Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge, and Galaxy Note 5, i.e. Samsung’s 2015 flagship lineup.

It’s worth noting that the app initially launched with the beta label though the latest 6.1.62-0 update is apparently the real thing. In other words, you shouldn’t experience any recurring performance, stability, and other issues usually related to software that’s in a beta stage of development. Naturally, only if you’re running the Play Store version of the app on one of the officially supported devices. Apart from the Play Store, Samsung Music is also available for download on the Galaxy Apps store. However, you’ll almost certainly need to be running Android 6.0 Marshmallow on your device in order to get the app from Samsung’s own proprietary app store, which means that there’s not much you can do if Samsung or your carrier are yet to launch the latest stable Android OS version on your device. Nothing but wait, that is.

As for the app itself, Samsung Music comes with support for a plethora of music formats, a robust filtering system, and integration for other Samsung smart devices such as TVs. It also boasts a pretty slick user interface and is only 6 MB in size, so it might be worth giving it a go if you’re on the lookout for an alternative Android music player. Among other things, the player requires access to your device and app history, wants to be able to manage device users, and modify secure system settings. If you feel that’s a bit too much and aren’t happy with the default Android player, there are plenty of other music players on the Play Store to choose from.