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Canada Study: Laptops, Smartphones and Mobile Sales

January 15, 2016 - Written By Cory McNutt

In the latest of Deloitte’s report, entitled, 2016 Canadian Technology, Media & Telecommunications Predictions, there is a little bit of news for everybody and some may be surprising.  For instance, the millennial generation of 18-24 year olds is the most pro-PC group of all age groups in 2016.  Even though they are certainly the ‘smartphone generation,’ they will purchase and use a PC more than any other age group in 2016.  Deloitte’s survey shows that 25-percent of the 18-24 year old Canadians intend on purchasing a new laptop in 2016.  In fact, 93-percent have access to a laptop versus the 91-percent that have access to a smartphone – of course this will soon change.  They consider the PC and smartphones as compliments to one another, not a replacement.

Robert Nardi, Partner and National TMT Leader for Deloitte in Canada explains, “What we’re seeing in terms of the bigger picture for 2016 is that mobile devices continue to be an important – even vital – part of our daily lives, capturing a significant amount of our time and money, but their influence only extends so far.  For the majority of Canadians, our smartphones and tablets complement or enhance rather than replace the traditional products we’re used to or, only slightly alter our behaviours.”  This is certainly understandable as these school bound young people need to do research and papers for classes  and a laptop is a necessity – you can only type so long on a smartphone or most tablets – in this case, the more traditional PC is more efficient.

Mobile touch for payments will increase making buying something with you laptop or smartphone easier and safer than ever before.  They predict that those using a third party touch-based payment service to make a purchase on their laptop or smartphone will increase by 150-percent and reach over million users in Canada during 2016. About 29-percent of Canadians browse shopping websites on a weekly basis using their smartphones – however, only about 6-percent will make the actual purchase because of the current checkout procedures.   The experts call this “cart abandonment,” but if all you have to do is place your fingerprint on your sensor to make the purchase, the task of buying on a smartphone just became easier than on your PC.

Duncan Stewart, Director of TMT Research at Deloitte in Canada, said, “Last year mobile payments began to go mainstream.  This year we’re seeing a continuation of that trend, whereby it’s getting easier and easier to use your phone to make secure transactions.  The check-out process is made much simpler if all you need is your fingerprint to authenticate and authorize payment in just one or two touches.  The days of filling out screen after screen of payment card details and both home and shipping addresses, we predict, are numbered.”  This is another good reason for all new smartphones to have a fingerprint sensor – it just make good business sense with security concerns and mobile payments on the rise.