Qwertycards

Qwertycards Help You Create Strong, Unique Passwords

December 7, 2015 - Written By Justin Diaz

Password security is an important factor in making sure that your life and personal information online stays private, especially in this day and age. For some people it may be easy enough to ensure excellent security online, but for most people remembering a strong and unique password for every website or account you access isn’t always simple. Furthermore, it’s not a quick and painless experience to recover your passwords if you forget what they are. A new system created by Qwertycards wants to make it easy and fast to create and remember strong, unique passwords by giving you two easy things to remember.

Now, if your a Google account user, there is likely no better, or at least easier method of strengthening your account than using two-factor authentication, but for everything else, the Qwertycard allows you to create a solid password that’s hard to crack and simple for you to use. The Qwertycard itself is a physical plastic card about the size of a credit or debit card that can easily fit in your wallet. On it is a image of a Qwerty keyboard and each letter (in black) is associated with a symbol, letter, or number (in white), along with a code in the space bar at the bottom of the card. Each code is unique to a singular card in possession of its user, as are the characters associated with each letter on the printed qwerty keyboard, so no two cards will be alike.

Utilizing this system, you can create a strong and unique password that starts with the code on the bottom, followed by a secret word which you create and finally the associated characters which are shown on the card for the website. With Facebook for example, you would enter your unique card code, your secret word, and then the word “Facebook” spelled out with associated characters. With Twitter, the only variable that would change would be the last piece of the sequence, and instead of typing out Facebook, you would type out Twitter in the associated coded sequence of characters. It sounds like it might be a little challenging at first for some users, but with a little time it should get simpler and the emphasis here is on the strength of the password without having to remember a long string of letters and numbers, lowercase and uppercase, etc. All users would have to remember is their secret word, and the website they visit, as the coded characters and the unique code from the card are displayed in front of you. The little cards can be picked up from the Qwertycards website for just $4.99, which isn’t a bad deal for ensuring password security for every website you use.