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LG’s SmartThinQ Will Make Old Appliances, Smart

August 31, 2015 - Written By Diego Macias

We’re just ahead of the beginning of IFA in Berlin, while some mobile products are expected, the event also showcases other kinds of products such as home appliances. LG will definitely make an appearance at that event, introducing some Wi-Fi enabled appliances like an oven and an air conditioner. Although, users may not see the benefits of having those devices connected immediately, the oven will be able to download and share recipes, plus it will include some features like the cooking mode, temperature and cooking time could all be set remotely and it can even be repaired remotely by looking for a solution on the LG service center. The air conditioner can also be controlled remotely so that the temperature is perfect when users get home and they could be notified if the filter needs to be replaced.

These appliances will be compatible with the internet of things (IoT) platform AllJoyn, which was developed by the Allseen Alliance and is used by more than 180 companies. But what if some users have recently bought one of those appliances and don’t want to spend some extra bucks to have that kind of functionality?

LG will also introduce their SmartThinQ sensors, which may be attached to some compatible appliances making them “smart-aware”. These circular devices will be able to sense vibrations and temperature changes from washing machines and refrigerators, for example, and send them to the SmartThinQ app on the smartphone. With the sensor attached at the door of a washing machine users will be notified when the laundry cycle has completed. On a refrigerator, users can keep track on how many times the door is opened and the sensor will also alert users when a certain food is about to expire. Additionally, users will be able to remotely control their air conditioner and other appliances with the new sensors. We will have to wait a little longer to know more about these devices, but LG thinks that the adoption for smart home appliances has been a little slower than expected because consumers tend to think this technology is still too expensive, so they might be looking to price their options more favorably to attract a wider audience.