Moto X Pure HandsOn 2 AH 23

Motorola’s Moto X Style (Pure) Scores High in DxOMark Test

July 29, 2015 - Written By Tom Dawson

The Moto X has become a staple device for a lot of users out there, and today’s announcements will probably make both those happy with previous Moto X devices, as well as those on the fence about switching to a Moto device, think twice. While the Moto X Play and Moto G are both admirable devices that have all the features most could want in a device, the 5.7-inch Quad HD Moto X Style, known as the Moto X Pure in the US, is the top of the range. Not only is this the best device that Motorola has launched in recent memory, but it’s also got it where previous devices failed; in the camera department.

At the heart of the Moto X Style’s imaging department is a 21-megapixel sensor with an f/2.0 aperture, and Motorola made some bold claims that it was “best in class”. To make sure they didn’t come across as someone that was just blowing hot air, Motorola gave testers from the respected DxOMark website pre-release devices to put the Moto X Style through its paces. While “best in class” might be a little stretch, it competes with the likes of the Galaxy S6, scoring 83 to Samsung’s 86 and takes the third top spot after the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy Note 4. To put things into perspective, the HTC One M9 from earlier this year sits far, far behind at 24 in the DxOmark smartphone rankings.

Throughout the full report (which those interested in the nitty gritty will find down below at the source link), the Moto X Style was praised for keeping detail at 100% crop and keeping noise to a minimum. Colors seem nice and accurate, with little shifting throughout. Rather than being washed out, or too warm, these seem just about right and in the overall report, the new Moto X flagship scores consistent fours out of fives throughout the majority of still picture scores. Not just that, but it gets a fairly well-rounded report from the testers at DxOMark, and it’s surprising to see a Motorola device rank so highly after a number of releases with poor results.