Moto G 2015 Hands On AH 25

Moto G 3rd Gen Gets Put Through Benchmarks

July 28, 2015 - Written By Justin Diaz

With the announcement of the Moto G 3rd Gen this morning at Motorola’s official event, those looking for a new device which doesn’t break the bank but is still capable of handling everyday tasks fairly easily might be looking to Motorola to provide them with a solution. Last year’s Moto G was no powerhouse, but it was no slouch either, and that’s OK since it was never meant to be a powerhouse device. It fits right into the low-end price tier but Motorola has packed the Moto G 2015 full of decent specs for the cost, like 16GB of internal storage space and 2GB of RAM, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 processor, and an Adreno 306 GPU for handling the graphics.

How does it score in the benchmarks though? While benchmarks are not the end-all be-all for how a device will perform in the real world and everyone’s experiences will be different since they use the device differently, they still provide a good peek into what you can expect from the device when it’s in your hands and you’re using it as a daily driver. We ran it through some benchmarks to see how it stacked up, and it seems to have performed quite admirably with the hardware that’s built inside of it. We ran it through both AnTuTu as well as GFX Open GL to see how the CPU as well as the GPU performed in various tests.

In GFX Open GL, a series of high level tests were ran to see how it handled graphics processing. In the Manhattan test which is used to test out how it handles graphics rendering in 720p, it came up with a score of 237.2 frames at 3.8 fps. The same test was ran to see how it handles 1080 graphics rendering and the score came up a little lower at 102.5 frames at 1.7 fps. GFX also runs the T-Rex test in both 720p and 1080p, and here the Moto G 3rd Gen scored 535.2 frames at 9.6 fps and 293.5 frames at 5.2 fps respectively. In the low level test it was capable of rendering 720p graphics with a score of 1,003 frames at 33 fps. When we ran the device through AnTuTu it came up with a score of 23,836, which may not be comparable to higher-end devices, but compared to the Moto G 2nd Gen it’s an improvement, as the previous Moto G has an AnTuTu score of somewhere around 18,000. So, the Moto G is still not for those looking to grab something with the most powerful hardware, but should you want something a little more light on the cost, the new Moto G should easily handle everyday tasks including games, videos and the like.