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Cloud Computing Pioneer Calls Google, Amazon “Weak”

June 24, 2015 - Written By Tom Dawson

While we all think of Google as a major player in the Cloud Computing space, it’s hard to forget that Amazon and their AWS web service, which powers popular websites, have been around for some time now as well. Before them however, was Cloud.com, a small startup that figured out a way of turning any data center into a cloud platform. Citrix paid over $200 Million for them back in 2011, and now some of the original employees are back with a new venture, dubbed Rancher Labs, and they have some choice words to share concerning Google and friends.

Rancher Labs CEO Sheng Liang and Director of Engineering Will Chan recently enjoyed a $10 Million investment round, and are now focusing on software containment, similar to the new hot product from Docker. You could think of software containment as a reverse engineering of cloud services, only to put it back out there again. What these technologies allow people to do is to create code on their own personal hardware, not connected to the Internet, perfect it and make sure it runs and then send it off to the Cloud without a care in the world. It basically allows developers to get their services and products right, before even having to worry about which Cloud services they’re going to choose.

Speaking about Google and Amazon, current leaders in the Cloud Computing revolution, Liang said that they’re “weak” and “irrelevant because they’re [the] last generation”. Liang notes that while Rancher isn’t here to shake things up, the future is much brighter in the Cloud than just what Google and Amazon can currently deliver. With all of the technology that powers products like Google Now and Amazon’s Cloud services, it makes us wonder what’s next, and startups like Rancher and Docker might just have the answer. Liang ends his interview with Business Insider with some wise words of wisdom to any budding team of engineers; “the only sure thing that kills a startup is being too early to market.”