AdBlock Theft AH 01

European Networks Reportedly Planning to Block Mobile Ads

May 15, 2015 - Written By Tom Dawson

 

When browsing online, reading news stories just like this one, or watching your favorite YouTuber, you’re bound to come across a handful or more of ads. For a long time now, publishers, readers and watchers have all disagreed on the whole existence of ads. However, it’s a well known fact that money doesn’t grow on trees and publishers need to be paid for their content. Considering that the vast majority of people are unwilling to pay for said content, publishers then turn to ads as it keeps things free for the end user, while also generating revenue for the publisher. Now, there’s a worrying report that several European operators are looking to block ads on their mobile networks, specifically targeting Google and mobile ads.

According to the Financial Times, there are several European operators – who haven’t been named at this point – that are looking to block ads on their networks. Apparently, these networks are unhappy that their investments in new networks aren’t having the massive effect that they should do because of all the ads bogging down websites. More than that though, the networks are unhappy that they are getting 0% from these ads running on their networks. Google is, once again, enemy number one here according to the report.

Putting aside the arguments of net neutrality and whether or not blocking any content is moral, it doesn’t quite seem fare that they should be able to block ads. Sure, there’s the argument that they control their network, but at the very core of it all is the argument that without ads, sites will struggle to take a cut, pay their contributors and stay open. Without sites, there’s no content and without any content there’s no reason to pay for a 4G contract and pay for lots of data. Obviously, this example has been taken to its extreme, but this raises some serious questions concerning net neutrality and whether or not blocking ads is going to make that big a difference to their networks.