Emojis AH

Emoji Use Soars Online as Users Forego Words for Smilies

May 4, 2015 - Written By Dominique Vishnudatt

LOL, a new trend again? Well, believe it or not, this looks rather promising! After many types of internet slang abbreviations, a new trend-setter is rising above all the others. This time, emoji’s are stealing the show. Steadily, they’re becoming an ever-expanding way for people to communicate, and Instagram is the prime example. More than 50% of the social network’s daily comments now compromise of Emoji’s.

Yes, those little smiley figures and the little hearts! Popping up everywhere, emoji’s have casually been implemented in many new keyboards, and it’s starting to show. Apple started us off when they implemented emoji’s in their keyboard back in 2011, not much later Android would follow. Nowadays, internet slang abbreviations such as LOL, ROFL, and LMFAO just don’t cut it anymore. The laughing/crying emoji is all the rage now, along with heart-eyed, I-love-it emoji.

It’s not everyday that a new language is born, so Instagram has been trying to make the proper adaptations; users can now hashtag their emoji’s and search for their desired mood. Wondering how different countries party on friday night? Search the party hat with confetti hashtag and be dazzled. Need to see some inspirational pictures to get you through the day? The thumbs up emoji is there for you.

But that’s merely the beginning for Instagram: after having implemented the emoji hashtag, the company is now pushing to establish a dictionary if you will. Yes, that’s right, an emoji dictionary. The idea is to properly define what all emoji’s represent, and understand the semantics of particular emoji’s. Certain emoji’s are more frequently used in combination with others and that is a valuable tool to show what exactly is being posted on Instagram.

The craze has been firmly present in Finland where over 60% of posts use emoji’s. The US only has 38% of emoji’s accounting for their total comments, but no worries, they’re still far more ‘hip’ than Tanzania who’s down to 20%.