Samsung Apps AH

Samsung Said To Be Rewriting TouchWiz For 64-Bit Processors

February 13, 2015 - Written By David Steele

Samsung’s TouchWiz user interface has come for a log of bad publicity over the years. It’s been criticised for looking too much like iOS, for being big and bloated with far too many applications that users simply don’t want, need or use, for having many features that again aren’t used and finally, for being relatively slow on powerful hardware. The other interface that has often been criticised for being resource hungry is HTC Sense, which over the years has been streamlined for better performance whilst retaining a HTC-look. We’ve news today that Samsung is set to rewrite TouchWiz to take advantage of modern, 64-bit processors. And this by itself shouldn’t be news, because if the Galaxy S6 is to debut with a newer generation Exynos processor that can run in 64-bit mode, it would be perfectly sensible for Samsung to rewrite the software to take advantage of the new hardware features.

The level and depth of the 64-bit optimization has yet to be clarified but news from Poland, where Samsung have a significant research and development plan, is that they are working on rewriting the stock dialer, messaging application, gallery and other bundled “added value” applications. If this is true, Samsung are reinventing the 32-bit TouchWiz wheel, which is also a reinvention of the stock Android wheel. The source website cites that the new version of TouchWiz is being tested on 64-bit hardware and is “really fast” and this is good news, but then if the rumored Exynos 7420 processor is as fast as they’re boasting, the software ought to run quickly anyway. Let’s hope that Samsung’s improvements will both enhance speed and help battery life.

Although Android devices powered by a 64-bit processor were launched in 2014, they’ve yet to capture much of the market. I believe that this will change in 2015 as more manufacturers adopt the new architecture (driven, I’m sure, by component prices dropping). And this in turn means that Samsung’s investment into rewriting the TouchWiz interface code for 64-bit support can be relatively easily ported across to the other up-and-coming (64-bit) models in the range. I hope that Samsung do take advantage of the improved technology to migrate all of their new launch devices to 64-bit, but we won’t find out until the year progresses.

What do you think to TouchWiz? Do you prefer the stock interface, or other manufacturers’ skins? Would you prefer Samsung devices more as a Google Play Edition, or are you happy with TouchWiz? Let us know your thoughts in the usual fashion, folks!