Net Neutrality

Android Headliner: The FCC Is Likely To Change Up Net Neutrality Rules, And It Would Be A Good Thing For Customers

February 8, 2015 - Written By Justin Diaz

News on Net Neutrality is everywhere on the internet, and it makes perfect sense since it pertains to the very outlet people are using the consume news on the subject, the internet. There has been much talk about the reclassification of Net Neutrality rules and why it will end up being a good thing for consumers yet a bad thing for large corporations, such as Verizon Wireless, AT&T, Comcast and others, but the largest reason comes down to the fact that if the FCC ends up reclassifying wireless and wireline internet under Title II as a public utility, IPS’s won’t be able to charge more to content providers such as Netflix to ensure they have fast and reliable service connections to give to their customers.

Many companies have spoken out against the use of these paid peering arrangements that internet providers want to put in place, but they aren’t alone as they have been joined by advocates for a more open internet that want to prevent ISP’s from creating such an environment that many believe will hinder innovation, even though companies like Comcast and others claim the extra money will allow them to innovate faster. As the ruling over Net Neutrality regulations is scheduled to have a decision made by February 26th, it’s looking more and more likely that FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is going to reclassify wireless and wireline internet under Title II, which will will basically ban wireless and wireline providers like AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast from favoring specific websites over others and charging extra fees to those they feel they can get more out of. With this ban in place, this will make it better for customers as well as the companies who are in favor of Wheeler’s proposal for reclassification, because neither will end up having to pay even higher costs.

Having both broadband and wireless internet under the same classification will also bring both service types closer together, while also protecting consumers and content providers from the likes of the companies we access our data from. Not all wireless providers are necessarily against these new possible rulings, as Sprint reportedly mentioned that they feel the Title II reclassification wouldn’t affect their ability to provide service, further stating that reclassifying things will keep competition intact. Banning companies that provide internet access to users from favoring certain parties over another so that they might earn some extra cash is will keep things on an even playing field for both customers and content providers, and if companies want to continue to charge a certain amount for their services with faster access, they’ll be forced to innovate instead of having control.