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The iPhone Is “Terribly Boring” According To HTC’s Jeff Gordon

January 31, 2015 - Written By David Steele

We’ve seen a number of companies announce business numbers this week and we here at Android Headlines have devoted a fair amount of website pixels towards covering this. Credit where credit is due, Apple have sold almost 75 million iPhones between October and December across the world. That’s more than one per person in the United Kingdom. This isn’t a great surprise: Apple invented the large screen device in 2014 and people have clearly flocked to buy one. If you detect a little bit of sarcasm, you’re absolutely right: Apple fans verging on the fanatics (there’s another pun in here too) have proclaimed the big screen iPhones to be amazing products, whilst a few months earlier, whining about big screen Android devices. Having seen, experienced and handled the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, they’re… okay. Nice hardware, nothing new here thanks, but the software ruins it for me. However, everywhere I look, people have the new iPhone and it’s boring.

I even went as far to pick the iPhone as a business handset, because I figured I wouldn’t want to work on it unless absolutely necessary (consider it a form of psychological home / work life balance) but after a week of it running out of battery and inconsistently connecting to a couple of the WiFi routers I frequented, arranged to swap it for a HTC One M7. Best. Decision. Ever. I’m sure Jeff Gordon, HTC’s Senior Global Online Communications Manager, would approve! This week Jeff congratulated Apple on their results and then said that the iPhone is “terribly boring.” And he’s right. Boring isn’t necessarily bad (sometimes I dream that all Apple iPhone buyers are indeed wrong, but I’ve always woken up so far!) but with so many of the world carrying the iPhone combined with Apple’s straight-jacket of control, everywhere you go, there you are. The old joke is that if you want to customize your iPhone, buy a new case or change the wallpaper. If you want to customize your Android device, there are a huge number of things that you can do to the software to make it exactly how you want it. And then change it the following day.

It’s probably the best problem for a business to have. Their mobile product is ubiquitous, tightly controlled, carries a huge margin on both the hardware and third party applications, and is designed to sell other Apple products. The smartphone product is boring but generally reliable (at least for the first twelve months), as easy to use and for some unknown reason, causes ordinary people to proclaim it’s the best thing, ever. I try not to let it get under my skin that Apple recycle existing ideas without improving them, causing legions of iOS fans to announce that Apple “made it work” or some such nonsense. And on that bombshell: brace yourself, the iWatch, sorry, Apple Watch is coming.