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CyanogenMod 12 (CM12) Offers SuperSU Root Privilege Control Without The Need For Separate App

January 4, 2015 - Written By John Anon

Cyanogen has definitely come more to the news forefront over the last twelve months. This is not to say, that they were not known before as they already had established themselves as a major custom alternative to stock android. That said, there’s little arguing with how their joint venture with OnePlus and then their public falling out has not upped their profile. Of course, you can argue whether the upping was for good or bad reasons.

All that aside though, the news was mainly surrounding what we know as commercial Cyanogen, CyanogenOS. Recently though, we have started to see more news developing on the other side of Cyanogen, CyanogenMod (CM). This is due to the stable version of CyanogenMod 12 (CM12) edging closer to a release state. There still is no date as to when the CM version of Android 5.0 (Lollipop) will be made available and chances are the date won’t be known in advance. CM much prefers to just release their ROM versions, then give prior warning and have to deal with abiding by those pre-set dates. That said as the stable version does near, we are starting to hear more and more about what CM12 will contain. This is thanks to those who fly-by-night with the nightly (experimental) versions of CM12 which are already available to download. One of those newer additions (or changes depending on which way you look at it) is that CM12 will no longer require SuperSU as a separate app.

For those unaware, when you root a device (most tend to use SuperSU to root) you are automatically greeted with a new app addition in your tray. This is the SuperSU app and allows for adjusting and tweaking of root permissions of other apps. However, it seems in CM12, these root permissions will all be able to be controlled from within CM itself. The ROM does already offer a similar function for non-rooted apps in the form of ‘Privacy Guard’ which basically allows users to set the permissions (what apps can and can’t do/access) on an app-by-app basis. However, the latest news highlights that the SuperSU version of this function for rooted apps will be directly incorporated into Privacy Guard. Thus allowing the control of root permissions directly from within CM. The news comes directly from the CyanogenMod code review site where the addition of SuperSU was announced. It is too early to know how well this function will work as an integrated function, but it is nice to see that the latest version of CM will be more tuned-in to rooters needs. Are you looking forward to CM12? Already using a nightlie? What do you like and dislike? Let us know.