Samsung-Logos-AH-2

Conjection: Samsung Switch Concept Phone, Quickly Switches From TouchWiz to Stock Interface

December 29, 2014 - Written By David Steele

We’ve seen rumors of what Samsung may be bringing to the smartphone tablet in 2015 and today, I’m writing about a concept design called the Samsung Switch that looks especially interesting. This handset is reckoned to be based around the latest generation, big.LITTLE, 64-bit Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor. This is the processor that includes a quad core, high efficiency processor for tasks that require less power, but combined with a high performance quad core processor for the heavy processor lifting. The device features a 4.8-inch, 1080p resolution screen and an optically stabilized 20.7 MP rear camera incorporating ISOCELL technology. There’s a 3.7 MP front facing camera, a 2,890 mAh battery and a quad speaker arrangement. The device is built out of a blend of a metal frame with a glass front and either a metal or polycarbonate rear.

However, whilst the hardware sounds interesting enough, it’s the software where Samsung have traditionally added value due to their TouchWiz interface, which in recent years has included a great many non-standard features such as smart alert (where the device gives a vibrate if you have a waiting notification) and smart stay (keeping the screen on when you look at it), to name just two that have been around since the 2012 Galaxy S III. However, this concept design has the user able to switch between the TouchWiz and stock interfaces very, very quickly.

This is an interesting development and one that I’ve hoped manufacturers would incorporate. You see, part of the reason why a manufacturer will spend time and money on a certain interface is to provide users with a branded experience, both in terms of how the device looks, feels and works, plus of course a platform for all of their extra features. However, not everybody likes the changes to the user interface and for some manufacturers, the changes under the skin with Google’s interface are not necessarily visually compatible with the manufacturer skin. The Switch perhaps answers this complaint by giving users the ability to adopt the TouchWiz skin or the stock skin (which has come a long way in the last few years). This could be a little bit like the Samsung Easy mode, which was also implemented in 2012: maybe we’ll see Samsung with three interfaces for customers including the simplified Easy Mode? Here’s the video clip below; let us know what you think in the comments below.