Rockchip

New Rockchip-Power Chromebooks Will Arrive by Mid-2015 and Cost Only $149

November 13, 2014 - Written By Phil Bourget

Chromebooks.  The more affordable mobile computing solution that has been stealing the show lately is one that many didn’t expect.  A computer with an Intel Celeron processor, 4 GB of RAM, and 32 GB of storage could cost you a lot, either in money or performance, if it runs Windows, but with Chrome OS, it can fly through the rings that you have for tasks throughout the day.  Chrome OS doesn’t need high specifications, so it doesn’t require those parts’ price tag, so you the customer don’t have to pay for unnecessary hardware.  And that’s why Chromebooks have been killing it in sales: price.  But now, we might have further confirmation of an even more affordable Chromebook.  Lenovo and Asus are the names to know for this one.

The third name is actually one you might not know that well, and that’s Rockchip.  Rockchip is a Chinese processor manufacturer, like Qualcomm with Snapdragon and Samsung with Exynos.  Up to now, the company has worked on tablet processors with a demonstration of the Chrome-running capabilities of their processors coming earlier this year.  But now, as we heard earlier, the next Chromebook price bracket will be set even lower, resting proudly at a reported $149 USD.  That is insane for a fully-capable computer that will get updates for as long as it has the storage space for it.

The best part is the way that the price compares to the already-affordable Acer C720, which sits around $200.  That, and the fact that these Chromebooks, both boasting an 11.6-inch display, are set to launch by the first half of 2015, and that’s at the very latest.  This means we could have two more great Chrome OS devices by next summer, which is always great.

Chromebooks are great for students, as we’ve mentioned before, and they’re also great if you just need a computer that can get you online to the Internet of things and let you do some word processing, spreadsheeting, and slide showing.  They are lightweight physically and won’t put you back that much money depending on which manufacturer and model you go for.  This coming from an Asus C300 educational model user, by the way.  These Chromebooks will add even greater stability to the already powerful Chrome empire and lineup, so it will be interesting to see how these new additions round out the bottom price bracket.

Have you ever used a Chrome OS device like a Chromebook?  How did it compare to a normal laptop?  Do you think that, at $149, these upcoming Chromebooks might make some not-so-okay corner cuts taken to make that price work, or will it simply add to the lineup and choices someone has?  More importantly, will these new additions actually help, or could they hurt, the growth and popularity of Chromebooks?  Let us know down below.