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Huawei Ascend Mate 2 To Jump From Jelly Bean to Lollipop In 2015

November 21, 2014 - Written By David Steele

It was only a few weeks ago I wrote that the Huawei Ascend Mate 2 won’t be receiving Android Kit Kat. At the time I speculated that perhaps Huawei would skip Android 4.4 Kit Kat and move the Ascend Mate 2 straight to Android 5.0 Lollipop. According to a Blog post from Huawei, this is exactly what’s planned and we have a broad timescale: the first half of 2015. It seems that Huawei have taken on the (mostly vitriolic!) feedback and their promise is good news. Of course, some people don’t believe that Huawei will deliver on this promise but personally I’m confident that they’ll deliver on this one. We’ll likely never know if this was the plan all along, but there were better ways to tell the industry than explaining that the update to Kit Kat was cancelled. As for the merits of skipping a software update, I would be okay with this. There are material improvements between The Mate 2’s 4.3 Jelly Bean and 4.4 Kit Kat, but the differences between 4.4 and 5.0 Lollipop are wider. Updating to 4.4 would at best be an interim solution: let’s save Huawei’s engineers the trouble and move the Mate 2 straight to Lollipop!

As for the Mate 2 running Lollipop; the device should be more than capable. Under that 720p resolution, 6.1-inch screen the Huawei has a 1.6 GHz quad core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor equipped with a healthy 2 GB of RAM. That’s close to the 2013 Nexus 7, give or take. The device also has 16 GB of internal storage plus a MicroSD card that can take an additional 64 GB of storage. There’s a 4,050 mAh battery powering the device and when Alex tested the device, he came away impressed with the Herculean battery life. Google have made several improvements to Android 5.0 Lollipop designed to improve battery life so I am expecting great things from the Mate 2 post-Lollipop.

There are some questions about the update. The first is that the first half of 2015 gives Huawei a wide window and suggests that their resources are spread thinly on the ground, or perhaps that their engineers are working on other projects. I also harbour some concerns that they’ll miss this window, especially if there are other devices in the pipeline (and surely there are) for the coming seven months. Nevertheless, I’m taking this news as far more positive than negative. But what do you think? Let us know in the comments below.