Moto-360-AH-2

The Moto 360 May Be Experiencing A Problem With Image Persistence

September 20, 2014 - Written By Jamil Bryant

Now that the Moto 360 is out in the world, it is now time for the watch to experience the everyday and unique uses people will take it through. Usually on this journey, problems will arise and many people will take to forums to inform others and also look for fixes. In this case, the Moto 360 has come across a problem and it has to do with the display. On the Moto 360, Motorola chose to go with a LCD display. With and LCD display, you don’t have to worry about burn-ins like you would on an AMOLED display. Although Motorola used an LCD display, some users have come forward reporting what they think are burn-ins on their displays. According to Android Police, the “Burn-ins” look more like an Image Persistence problem.

This problem is common for LCD screens and are far less worse then a burn-in. Now to go more in depth with this problem, burn-ins are when an image sits to long on a display. When this happens on an AMOLED display, you’ve pretty much destroyed your screen because the pixels are burnt out. Now Image Persistence is quite similar to a burn-in, but can be reversed. A simple fix for Image Persistence would be to turn off the screen for a long duration and then when you turn the device back on, play a moving image to knock the pixels back into place. This problem has recently popped up, so we do not know for certain what the real issue at hand may be.

In addition, reports of this issue are sparse. There could be a fix, but we aren’t too sure of what the real problem may be. If this becomes a widespread problem, Motorola may have to change the behavior of the charging screen in the next update for the watch. If thats the case, the problem is solved. If you happen to have a Moto 360 and are currently experiencing this problem, let us know in the comments section. Drop a few screenshots of your watch so we can see for ourselves what’s going on. We have a gallery below for you to see what this Image Persistence looks like.