china_cell_phone_walkway

Chinese City Introduces Mobile Only Specific Walking Lanes To Help Speed Up Pedestrian Traffic

September 15, 2014 - Written By John Anon

We all know what it’s like. You’re almost running down the street while trying to maintain a look of grace and decorum to those you pass. You are extremely late for an appointment, meeting or date. As you scuttle along the pavement you suddenly find yourself slowing to an almost snail’s pace due to some guy in front of you who barely seems to be moving forward. What’s he doing? Ah, yes, he is doing the age old tradition of updating his status and replying to messages while walking down the street. It seems these days’ people are incapable of multi-tasking in this respect. The more someone focuses on the phone the less they seem to be able to walk effectively in a straight line, at a steady pace or even avoid bumping into you. So what do you do? Politely wait until the guy realizes you are there (or finishes his updating) and moves at a more human pace? Barge passed him while giving him a look to let him know how you feel? Or simply say ‘excuse me’ as if it’s your fault while you pass and get back on track?

Well, none of the above if you live in China. It seems Chongqing in South West China may have come up with the solution. Since last week it seems the Chinese city has introduced a number of ‘mobile lanes’ for the sidewalk. Now as you walk down the pavement it suddenly splits into two lanes with one lane dedicated for those walking at a ‘normal’ pace. The other a dedicated cell phone lane where users can walk as slow as they like while updating their status, streaming a movie or whatever it is they do which just cant wait.

One interesting feature of the two lane system is the cell phone lane seems to be the one closest to the road. It is difficult to know if this was intentional as it is probably safe to assume those using phones without looking where they are going would probably be better away from the traffic. However, the new cell phone lane does clearly state ‘Walk in this lane at your own risk’. The other lane also very clearly states ‘No Cellphones’, so next time you are walking down a street in Chongqing make sure you are walking in the right lane. You never know it could be a crime to walk in the wrong lane soon. So what do you think? Do you like this idea? Are you one of those pedestrian traffic-stopping phone users? Would you like to see similar lanes in all cities around the world? Let us know what you think.