t-mobile-sprint-ah-1

WSJ Says there’s no Rush for T-Mobile/Sprint Deal

July 30, 2014 - Written By Alexander Maxham

We’ve been hearing about a T-Mobile/Sprint deal for quite some time now. In fact the first we heard of it was last December. And just yesterday, word was that we wouldn’t hear an official deal until September – which of course it’d need to be approved after that. Now there’s a report coming out of The Wall Street Journal that the two carriers don’t need to rush to close the deal due to it’s public nature. There’s a pretty big article, that’s very interesting as well, which shows the codenames for the four carriers and names this “Project Oregon”. Which involves involves the Tiger (T-Mobile), the Swan (Sprint), the Hawk (SoftBank) and the Dove (Deutsche Telekom). According to the WSJ ““When will the Swan make a bid for the Tiger, giving the Hawk a stronger foothold in the U.S. market and providing the Dove its long-sought exit?”

The pseudonyms were the last remaining unknowns in the deal between Sprint and T-Mobile, or more importantly between Softbank and Deutsche Telekom. What we do know is that the deal is reportedly for $40 per share, along with a breakup fee of around $2 billion, that Softbank has secured $45 billion in financing from a few banks and T-Mobile’s current CEO John Legere would take over the reigns of the combined company when the deal does go through.

The WSJ Reports that the reason its taking so long to get a deal finalized is due to a few key points. But since the deal is in the public eye, neither carrier is in a rush to announce anything. Another reason is that Deutsche Telekom’s chief merger and acquisition advisor is on vacation right now. And so is DT’s CEO Tim H¶ttges. Which they would be a very important part of this deal, obviously. However, this delay allows for both the carriers and regulators to get their arguments in order, for or against this merger. Which I’ve heard plenty of both sides, and I’m still not sure whether I want this to go through or not. But so far the FCC doesn’t want to approve this merger. So we’ll have to wait and see how persuasive Masayoshi Son is.