Google Glass And Commercial Air Drones Get less Optimism Than Future Tech

April 17, 2014 - Written By Justin Diaz

According to a study done by Pew Research, Americans were asked a series of questions that pertained to their feelings over matters like scientific and technological advancements in the future. More specifically over the span of the next fifty years. Surprisingly some were quite optimistic about certain things while others were less so over stuff that is already here and making its way to the consumer market for purchase. The study asked some 1,000 Americans for their opinions on such advancements, and the final report by Pew Research stated that they found that the American public anticipates that the coming half-century will be a period of profound scientific change, as inventions that were once confined to the realm of science fiction come into common usage.

What was interesting about the study shows that people are more in high spirits and had a more positive outlook when it came to questions about technological advancements that were set out to be 50 years from now, with 59% saying they were optimistic that technology would help improve the quality of life in 50 years, while an astounding 81% think that we could have the capability to grow organs in a lab for people that need them in that same 50 year timeframe. The funny thing, is that those ideas of technological advancements are more openly accepted and yet so far off, compared to things like Google Glass which is a hit or miss.

There are plenty of people who love Google Glass, but it seems like there is an almost equal amount that have negative feelings towards it. According to the survey done by Pew, 53% said that wearable devices-like Google Glass for example-which kept us in a state of constant connection would make things worse. An even larger number-63%-think it would be a bad idea if commercial and personal drones, like the ones that Amazon is trying to get approved for super fast delivery, became something that was possible and mainstream. While it is cool to think about some of the technological advancements that we could be looking at 50 years from now, it’s interesting to find out what people think of the things that are being researched now and are almost here. What will people think in 50 years of the same technological advancements that they’re currently intrigued with? Will they have just as much of a positive outlook then?