Samsung Calls Up VP Of Android Engineering As Their First Defense Witness

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The latest trial between Apple and Samsung is of course still ongoing, as it’s scheduled to go all month long at the least. While this particular trial isn’t directed at Google and more so at Samsung for patent infringement with various software related features like auto completion of text, a Google executive took the stand today to answer some questions regarding the situation. The executive cited that Android too was the result of long hours of hard labor during long nights through out its early development, and continues to be a challenging project even today. While the Android operating system has come a long way since its early days, Hiroshi Lockheimer who is the Vice President of Android Engineering testified today that Android and the team that has made the operating system so robust and popular, like to have their own identity.

Hiroshi also testified that those long nights of grueling work haven’t ended, and that they continue to be a part of the hard work the team puts in to better the mobile OS, even today. We don’t think anyone but Apple would dispute the fact that many long hard hours were completed to bring Android to where it is today, and he intended to make that very clear as he took the stand as Samsung’s first witness as part of their defense. Up until now Samsung had been preparing for its defensive side of the case, and as part of calling up Google executives, Samsung is sticking to its claims that Apple’s patents were invalid, and there was no infringement committed.

In total there are 5 features that Apple is claiming that Samsung had infringed upon and is seeking more than $2 billion in damages. Apple’s last testimony was earlier today before Samsung called Hiroshi Lockheimer up as part of the defense plan, and we’d suspect that they have more than just the VP of Android engineering to call on for questioning. Lockheimer testified that the first time he saw a working demo of the Android OS was back in January of 2006, and he was so blown away by what he saw that by April he had joined Google to work on the project.

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