John Legere Made More Annually In 2013 Than Both Verizon And ATT CEO’s

April 25, 2014 - Written By Justin Diaz

Although T-Mobile may be in dead last when it comes to sheer size between the four major U.S. wireless carriers, when it comes to profit for the company CEO’s T-mobile rockstar leader John Legere actually comes in second place for total annual earnings, reaching $29.2 million according to the US Securities and Exchange Commission. It may or may not surprise you, but Sprint CEO Dan Hesse is the one who actually tops the chart for 2013 earnings, posting a total of $49.1 million last year. Verizon’s CEO Lowell McAdam brings up the rear with total annual earnings of $15.8 million, while AT&T CEO takes up third place earning an annual income of $23.2 million.

T-Mobile’s attack plan to shake up the wireless industry has been working, although it may not have been working as well as the company has been hoping as T-Mobile shares have declined by 1.3% as of today according to Bloomberg. Despite this though the efforts of John Legere to better T-Mobile’s position out of the four major carriers, has at least been bettering his own annual income. T-mobile is doing more to try and give customers even more value, with announcements to add in $40 plan that offers less data, with the plan targeting those who hardly use it. They’re also offering customers the ability to purchase LTE tablet models for the same cost as wifi only versions of the same tablets, making it that much more enticing to buy one if you’re a customer who uses the carrier or is looking into getting an LTE enabled tablet.

Even if the changes T-mobile has been introducing into their own plans and services has only been steadily increasing their standing, if anything it has still served to force the other carriers to change up their own plans to compete. AT&T’s responses to T-Mobile’s contract payout trick to gain customers saw the 2nd largest wireless carrier offering a similar deal to customers, which undoubtedly may have gained some back that they lost. AT&T and Verizon also both started offering their own versions of plans similar to T-mobiles JUMP, giving customers more choice than they had before on either of the two largest carriers.