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Google’s Nexus 6 to be Based on LG’s G3? Bring Fingerprint Sensor With It?

April 30, 2014 - Written By Tom Dawson

Considering that LG has made the Nexus smartphones for Google two-years running now, it’d hardly be surprising to see them do it again for a third time. Google has never been picky about who creates their Nexus devices and while a recent report surrounding Android Silver has thrown a little bit of doubt on future Nexus devices, we doubt that Google is willing to leave developers looking for a quality device to bring their apps to Android out in the cold. So, this leads us to the latest Nexus 6 rumor, which is that this Fall, we’ll bee seeing yet another LG Nexus, based on the G3.

Last year, the Nexus 5 was based on the G2, albeit with a smaller display and a much different, simpler design. Aside from the camera and display-size, the internals were pretty much the same as the G2, which meant those looking for a Nexus had a super-powerful device complete with a Snapdragon 800 to purchase – unlocked – for a very attractive price, indeed. According to reports from Android Geeks, a source has said that this year Google will be basing their Nexus device around the G3, and even bring some bells and whistles with it.

A fingerprint sensor – pegged to be included in the G3 – is said to make its way to the Nexus 6 as well, but we have our doubts about this. So too, is the dizzying display resolution of 2560 x 1440, with Google choosing a 5.2-inch display size to keep the physical size of the device down. All of this sounds pretty enticing, especially to someone like myself who thought LG did an excellent job on the Nexus 5. If Google are to keep the price down – as they’ve done with the Nexus 4 and 5 – we can’t see the Nexus 6 (or whatever it’s to be called) launching with bespoke features such as a fingerprint sensor. A fingerprint sensor would require a break in clean design and perhaps a physical button, both things that Google has been keen to move away from with previous Nexus designs. As is often the case, this is still an unsubstantiated report, so take this with a pinch or two of salt.