Huawei_Windows_Android_dual_boot

Huawei’s Dual-Boot Android Windows Phone is Now Extinct Like the Dinosaurs

March 19, 2014 - Written By Nick Sutrich

If you’ve been following Android news lately you might have heard of this weird concept from a few phone manufacturers like Asus and Huawei, to create phones and tablets that run both Android and Windows.  This sort of concept wasn’t exactly looked upon with favor from the people running Google or Microsoft, as both companies have publicly condemned these devices as soulless and lacking a specific user experience.  Even so Huawei stuck to its guns just a few days ago, saying that its dual-boot phone would be debuting as early as this Spring.  Fortunately for Microsoft and Google it seems that both Asus and Huawei have pulled plans to make these dual-boot phones, with Huawei just announcing the cancellation of their plans.  In a statement to FierceWireless a Huawei representative says that they were taking an “open approach” toward mobile operating systems and are determined to provide a range of choices for their consumers, however they were still going to mostly focus on Android in the future and that they are not currently planning to launch a dual-OS phone in the near future.

Considering the Huawei Chief Marketing Officer Shao Yang just told Trusted Reviews that Dual OS is Huawei’s future, it’s sort of confusing to see that statement retracted so quickly.  How could you blame Huawei though when they were facing pressure on both sides of the spectrum to cancel these products and focus on one OS for each device instead?  In addition to Huawei’s decision Asus has also canceled the Transformer Book Duet and will remove the Transformer All-In-One Desktop from the market.  Basically we’re not going to see an official dual-OS booting device in the near future, at least as long as Microsoft and Google have anything to do with it.  Is that really a bad thing though?  Dual-booting is confusing to say the least, and it presents a jarring enough experience to customers without having to deal with the myriad of different design languages between devices already, much less on the same device.