T-Mobile Ad Confirms Rumors, UNCarrier to Pay ETFs of Families Who Switch

| January 8, 2014 | 3 Replies

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Before even hitting the stage at CES 2014, T-Mobile has shoved their way into the spotlight. Surely many have heard of the “bold moves” CEO Legere has taken including crashing an AT&T after party. Even before CES even started at day zero, there were rumors of T-Mobile and the next big move to be made that hinted at taking customers from AT&T. Now, thanks to an ad posted to the interwebs, we have proof, and more details of what’s to come.

The ad looks to be real, and even has been taken down from some sites. Thanks to Droid-Life, we still have an image of the ad. After all of the trouble to take it down, it is safe to assume that it depicts perfectly what T-Mobile has up their sleeve. Though AT&T assumed the move would be against only them, and had a pre-emptive strike of their own, the ad shows otherwise. T-Mobile seems to be targeting all of their biggest competitors, by offering to pay the cancellation fees for families who switch to T-Mobile.

Though with any deal, there is a bit of fine print, though it doesn’t seem all that bad. What customers will need to do, is first of all provide the necessary proof of the cancellation fees, turn in their old phones, purchase new ones, and of course switch from AT&T, Verizon or Sprint. Seems like a lot to do, but really it’s what you would’ve done anyway when switching carriers, for the most part.

Other details will soon be out, and of course confirmation of the ad’s promise, but surely there will be a price cap. Meaning T-Mobile will most likely only pay up to a certain amount in termination fees. Rumors leading up to CES 2014, have said that the price cap will be around $350, so you would have to be near the end of your contract anyway with the carrier you would be switching from. As we know, termination fees start at a certain price at the start of a contract, and as you inch closer to the end of the contract, the price slowly drops. Some still feel that T-Mobile has grown fast when it comes to advertising, marketing and making headlines, but still needs to work a bit on their network. AT&T also announced a similar, limited-time offer earlier this month, but knowing T-Mobile we assume this is probably something a little more permanent.

We know there are plenty of people out there who have all different carriers, if you are not on T-Mobile, how have the “Bold Moves” affected your decision to stay away, if you have T-Mobile, what do you wish T-Mobile’s next “Bold Move” would be?

Category: Android Carrier News, Android News, CES Android News

About Ray Greer ()

I have been an Android enthusiast since the launch of the original Mytouch on T-Mobile. Since then I have continued to love Android and followed all things Android. We will continue to grow within the Android community, things are always changing growing getting better, and so will we.
  • Bonedatt

    Been with them 9 years now. I have a few suggestions: offer your customers free international UMA (WIFI) calling from the U.S to any country. It’s weird that I can call the U.S for free via UMA calling from Frankfurt, Athens, London or any other city but not the other way around. Also, unlock by default any device purchased from Tmobile while not including any pre-installed bloatware; rather offer them as downloadable apps. This will be an industry first. Finally allow OEM’S to push all phone updates directly to the consumers.

  • pickared

    I switched from AT&T in July ’13, and since I’m a very happy customer with unlimited LTE data plan from T-Mobile.

  • Maverick

    No on switching, very happy with the carrier I’m with which provides aggressive plans and pricing equivalent to or better and has a larger footprint in the mobile wireless market plus performance is great and service is A-1 in both customer and network.

    When tmobile expands it’s network way more than what it has and address the issues with network service on edge perhaps then I’ll consider them until then it’s not a viable option,