Korea To Have a 225mbps LTE Wireless Network Before 2015

January 20, 2014 - Written By Alexander Maxham

And you thought you’re 4G  LTE speed in the US was fast…

SK Telecom in Korea is looking to launch their new, insanely fast, LTE network before the end of this year. SK Telecom is Korea’s largest mobile carrier, and they have announced that they are planning to introduce a 225Mbps LTE-Advanced network later this year. I know what you’re thinking, current LTE-A networks can only reach 150Mbps. However, SK Telecom is using some new technology, that doubles that to download speeds. This speed is said to be made possible by using two different bands. For example, with Sprint’s Spark, a 300Mbps network could be possible in the future. But that’s a very distant future right now.

A 225Mbps LTE network is insane. I think the fastest download speed I’ve seen on LTE was around 70Mbps, and that was when Verizon had just launched their LTE network in my area, and not too many people were on it. Nowadays, the fastest I’ve seen in person is AT&T, which can hit around 50-60Mbps download on their 4G LTE network. I’d love to see a 225Mbps network available here in the US, but the only thing is data caps. With the current data caps, after running 1 or 2 speed tests on a 225Mbps network, you’d probably hit your cap. Unfortunately, that’s how things work over here in the US and most other markets. Now, if Sprint or T-Mobile could get their network to bring us 225Mbps speeds, than it would be great, especially if they keep unlimited data.

Sure, we probably don’t need anything more than 50Mbps on a phone or tablet right now, heck we could probably get away with just 10Mbps or less. But as technology progresses, so will data consumption. Which we’ve already seen that in the last few years, which is why many carriers have switched to tiered data unfortunately. Hopefully one of the US carriers will bring us some great speeds like this, on their LTE-Advanced network.

Via: Android Central
Source: SK Telecom
Image Credit: MacClure – Flickr