chromecast-guide

User Experience Guide for Chromecast Developers Gets Posted, What about the Whitelist?

December 12, 2013 - Written By Alexander Maxham

Chromecast has been a hot topic around here lately. Chromecast was first announced back in July along with the Nexus 7 2013. At the time we only had a handful of apps for the Chromecast which included YouTube, Netflix, Google Play Movies & TV and Play Music. Since then we saw Hulu Plus, HBO Go, and Pandora join the Chromecast apps section. Earlier this week, Google let the Chromecast app flood gates open by adding 10 more apps to the list of compatible apps. That was just the first wave of what is at least three waves of new apps. So we’re about to get some good stuff.

Now Google has posted a massive User Experience Guide for Chromecast Developers, it’s a 4000-word document which details the recommended design patterns developers should be using when implementing their own Android, iOS or web apps. Additionally, the guide also has recommended design principles for both the sender and receiver interfaces, where to place buttons, how to start and stop a cast, as well as what to do during the various states apps might find themselves in during operation. This user experience guide is very specific about what Google wants from Chromecast developers, which is really great. However, these are only guidelines and not requirements, I’d like to see Google make these requirements. It’d be nice to see uniformity among all the Google Chromecast supporting Apps.

Here’s the big question, what about whitelisting apps. Well Google hasn’t said a thing about it in this document. Which is kind of surprising, but then not so much. However seeing this document hit the interwebs is definitely good news for those with a Chromecast wondering about app support. Hopefully we’ll see the app whitelist disappear from Chromecast pretty soon. However, Google seems to be keeping a tight lock on Chromecast like they have Google Glass.

The Chromecast isn’t even just some small gadget that no one has, Time named it their gadget of the year, ahead of the iPad Air, Moto X, Nexus 5, and just about every other gadget released this year. Not to mention it’s only $35 making it an impulse buy (for those that haven’t bought it already, you can buy it here). For those that are interested in developing for the Chromecast should check out the Google Developers site to see the User experience guide. Hopefully we’ll get more information about getting apps on Chromecast soon.

What kind of apps do you want to see on Chromecast? Perhaps ESPN, ABC, and some other network apps? Then we could really get rid of our cable boxes, right? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.