Blue HTC One 5

Wake Your HTC One without Using Buttons with Pick2Wake and Flick2Wake

September 19, 2013 - Written By Nick Sutrich

If you’ve been an avid Android fan for a few years now, or even just someone who likes to read tech news around the web, you no doubt know Android is the king when it comes to features.  There’s all sorts of features out there in the world of Android, and practically every new Android phone introduces some new set of features that are supposed to wow you as a consumer and make you want that next big phone.  Recently we’ve seen a slew of crazy new features, and it all started with the HTC One and the Galaxy S4 earlier this year.  Those phones introduced all sorts of new camera trickery and various gesture based features that have been called everything from gimmick to must-have.  This fall we’ve got no shortage of new phones coming out, all of which have their own feature sets to grab your attention and (hopefully) money.  LG’s G2 is high on the feature end, and even includes one killer feature that we’re pretty excited about: Knock Knock.  This is a feature that allows you to wake the phone up by simply double tapping it no matter where it’s at.  So if it’s on the table and you don’t feel like picking it up to press the rear-mounted power button, you can just knock knock on the glass and it’ll wake up immediately.  So how would you like to have a feature like this on your phone right now?  Well if you’ve got a rooted HTC One, you’re in luck, because XDA developer tbalden has developed a kernel for your phone that gives you just what you want.


As you can see from the video, this new kernel gives you two new features: Flick2Wake and Pick2Wake.  Flick2Wake wakes the device up and puts it back to sleep when you fairly violently shake the device.  Personally I wouldn’t want to use this one, but it might be useful in some situations.  I can just imagine the phone flying out of my hand or something on a particularly humid day.  The second feature, Pick2Wake, is one that’s really interesting, and it lets you wake the device by just picking it up from a flat surface.  No knocking, no flinging or tapping, just pick it up and it’s awake within a second.  There’s of course one downside to this whole thing though, and that’s a big hit on battery life.  Phones have the best battery usage when the CPU is in a “deep sleep” state most of the time, and unfortunately this modification doesn’t allow the CPU to go into deep sleep for very long, as it has to check the orientation sensor constantly to see if the device has been picked up.  LG was able to get away with this “always on” feature on the G2 because the Snapdragon 800 processor that powers the G2 has a new chip inside of it called the Sensor Hub that allows the CPU to still enter a deep sleep state while the sensor hub monitors to see if there have been any changes.  Since no such thing exists in the Snapdragon 600 that powers the HTC One, the CPU has to do all the work.  This is an early build of the kernel, so anything is possible at this point.  We’ve seen features like this make their way to phones in the past that weren’t originally supported, so there’s always a possibility that this could come to other Snapdragon 600 powered devices from other developers too.  If you’re interested in trying it and have an HTC One, head on over to the XDA thread for full instructions.