Samsung Exynos 5420

Samsung’s New Exynos 5 Octa Get Benchmarked, Crushes Nexus 10

July 25, 2013 - Written By Brendan Lynch

Samsung took to the web yesterday and announced that it was updating its Exynos 5410 processor. The latest chip is dubbed the Exynos 5420 and is based on ARM Mali-T628 silicon. The 5420 is supposedly set to be 20 percent faster than the previous model. Up until now, we were all wondering what type of performance that would really put out and how noticeable it would be when compared to previous chips and other competitors.

Engadget was at SIGGRAPH 2013 recently and were able to get some hands on time with the prototype of the chipset. The device being used was an unknown tablet running the Exynos 5420. Obviously the first thing that they did was run a benchmark test on the device. To everyone’s surprise, the prototype performed almost twice as fast as the Nexus 10 being used for comparison.

So what does this mean? The Nexus 10 is currently running one the most powerful CPUs available, a Exynos 5 Dual (5250) SoC with Mali-T604 GPU. This means that the mobile world is about to be taken by storm once the 5420 begins to be mass produced.

However, do users really need this type of power? If what we heard from Samsung is correct, then there won’t be any reason not to. This chipset is supposed to have better power management, meaning that it will use the exact same amount of power as its predecessor. This is of course essential because most users are not willing to sacrifice battery life for a faster processor as battery life is becoming more and more important now.

These types of processors are going to become more and more essential as the Android spec war rages on. Companies are racing to develop the most impressive processors and up until recently, have unfortunately been wreaking havoc on battery life. It is great to see chips like these make an honest effort to cut down on battery consumption.

What do you guys think? Are you excited for this new processor? What type of effect do you think this will have on new devices’ performance?